ICL Journal Conference 2016-CALL FOR PAPERS

The Vienna Journal on International Constitutional Law is dedicated to a wide range of subjects including in particular European Constitutional Law, Public International Law, the Constitutionalization of International Law, the Internationalization of Constitutional Law, the Migration of Constitutional Ideas, Legal Theory, and Comparative Constitutional Law. By linking these select perspectives, the Journal endorses an approach towards a coherent understanding of International Constitutional Law, thus preparing the ground for novel answers to the challenges of a changing global legal framework.

For its 10 year anniversary the Journal will host a conference dedicated to its very scope: The one day event to be held on

23 September 2016

 at

 Vienna University of Economics and Business (WU) 

will focus on the concept of

International Constitutional Law

We are grateful that Frederick Schauer (David and Mary Harrison Distinguished Professor of Law, University of Virginia School of Law) and Alexander Somek (Professor of Legal Philosophy, University of Vienna) agreed to share their thoughts on the topic in two Keynote Lectures. Additionally, we encourage academics from around the globe to participate in this event and to introduce us to their ideas on the concept of ‘International Constitutional Law’, its origin, its meaning, its scope, and overall its heuristic and doctrinal value.

We are looking forward to receiving abstracts of no more than 300 words accompanied by your CV and, of course, to meeting you soon in Vienna. Submissions and inquiries may be directed to Maria Fegerl (maria.fegerl@wu.ac.at) until May 15. All applicants will be notified by May 31. Accepted papers will be included in ICL Journal Vol 11. Please be advised that travel expenses cannot be covered.

Latest Posts

Swiss votations on February 9, 2020

by Prof. Markus Kern / Fabian Schmid, University of Bern

On February 9, 2020, two proposals were up for decision by the Swiss electorate:
– the Popular Initiative claiming “more affordable homes” as well as
– a referendum concerning a ban on discrimination based on sexual orientation in criminal law
The Popular Initiative was rejected by 57.1% of the Swiss population and by all but 4½ of the cantons, whereas the amendment of criminal law was clearly accepted by a majority of 63.1% of the voters. Electoral turnout was at 41.7% resp. 40.9%.

Read More »

Illiberal constitutionalism 2 – constraints on public power

by Tímea Drinóczi, Professor, University of Pécs, Faculty of Law, Hungary

Illiberal states emerging in Europe, such as Hungary and Poland, are still constitutional democracies, which are shaped peacefully by populist politicians from a more substantial form of constitutional democracy that prioritizes (liberal) constitutional values through the use of populist style of governance, abusive constitutionalism, and autocratic legalism.[1] In our cases, the minimum requirements of a constitutional democracy, such as the rule of law, human rights, and democracy, have been defectively worded in a constitution, or poorly implemented or enforced.

Read More »